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Strong safeguards are needed when investing public money via private financial intermediaries

Martin Atkin

25 Jan 2018 14:38:46

You wouldn’t just hand your money over to someone else to invest without asking them what they were going to do with it, would you? If you were a public body, at the very least you’d want to make sure it wasn’t used in a way that damaged the environment or undermined human rights. Increasingly, however, there are concerns that development finance institutions (DFIs - government-backed institutions that invest in private sector projects in developing countries) - are lending money to private sector financial intermediaries (FIs) to invest in infrastructure projects in developing countries - without ensuring that proper environmental and social safeguards are in place. These intermediaries - private commercial banks, private equity funds and infrastructure funds - are essentially go-betweens ...

International public finance flows: 8 principles for transparent reporting

Jesse Griffiths

08 Sep 2016 14:19:02

How much public money does your country send to other countries, and for what purposes? The short answer is: we don’t know. The only reliable figures are those for the aid provided to help developing countries, collected by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and called official development assistance. Unfortunately, even these figures are confusing, as they include large amounts of money that never leave the donor country, such as administrative costs and and the costs of accommodating refugees. A better place to look than the headline-grabbing ODA figures is a less well-known measure, called country programmable aid which the OECD says is “a better estimate of the volume of [ODA] resources transferred to developing countries.” But what about other official flows ...
Public Private Partnerships (PPPs) are not transparent enough, and face criticism from civil society organisations (CSOs) and others for being too expensive, and a risky use of taxpayers’ money. On Monday (29 February) more than 50 CSOs have written ...
In a submission this week, Eurodad together with more than 50 members and partners from the North and South commented on the draft framework suggested by the World Bank Group on disclosure in public-private partnerships (PPPs).  Read the full submission ...
Read Eurodad's full statement to the OECD DAC High Level Meeting and press release on how the world's poorest should not pay for the security and defence of Europe. Today, Eurodad's director Jesse Griffiths spoke at the OECD Development Assistance ...
by Maria Jose Romero and Xavier Sol (Counter Balance) The European Investment Bank (EIB) has become one of the giants of the financing landscape – its lending was 77.5bn EUR in 2015 – and yet it remains highly unaccountable and opaque. Civil society ...
Ahead of the European Investment Bank's (EIB) annual consultation with civil society organisations (CSOs) on 2nd February, Eurodad and partners Counter Balance and CEE Bankwatch have sent a briefing to the EIB directors regarding the bank's priorities ...

Ending corporate secrecy: within our reach but slipping away

Christian Hallum

13 Nov 2014 15:20:34

Hidden Profits – a new report coordinated by Eurodad – exposes the policies that keep transnational companies’ profits untaxed. Coming hot on the heels of the recent leak from Luxembourg exposing corporate tax deals, the report finds that an important part of the tax dodging scandal is corporate secrecy. The report recommends a public register of beneficial owners as a key solution. The EU can make this happen in its review of its Anti-Money Laundering Directive, but urgent action is needed to counterbalance resistance to this idea. Last week’s leak from Luxembourg – quickly dubbed ‘Lux Leaks’ – shone some rare light into the secret world of how transnational companies get away with dodging their tax bills. Transnational companies have saved billions of dollars in taxes by ...