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Reacting to today’s European Commission proposals on new transparency rules for tax planning intermediaries, Eurodad welcomed the proposals but said they still leave a lot to be desired. “We agree with the European Commission that we need transparency ...

blog
Why a free press is vital for exposing financial injustice.

Martin Atkin

03 May 2017 09:13:38

As Antoine Deltour and Raphaël Halet - better known as the Luxleaks whistleblowers - prepare for the next legal battle to clear their names, it’s worth remembering that it was only thanks to the much-vilified “mainstream media” that the tax avoidance scandal was exposed. Leaked documents do not make a story by themselves - it also takes independent, determined journalism. The two former PwC employees are appealing against revised sentences handed down by a Luxembourg court for their part in exposing how multinational corporations used secret tax deals with the Grand Duchy to dodge taxes around the world. Although the court reduced their original punishments, the pair are fighting to clear their names altogether. But the whistleblowers deserve praise – not punishment. They were prosecuted ...
Eurodad has produced two briefings, one on Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) and public country by country reporting (CBCR), the other on DFIs and public disclosure of beneficial ownership (BO). The briefings put forward general recommendations ...

press
Upcoming EU presidency faces whistleblows and calls for transparency

On the same day that MEPs voted for greater tax transparency, upcoming EU presidency, Luxembourg, faced demonstration at Embassy for prosecuting ‘Luxleaks’ whistleblower and journalist. Thursday May 7 Campaigners from across the world came together outside the Embassy of Luxembourg in Copenhagen today (Thursday May 7) and blew the whistle on corporate secrecy and prosecutions of whistleblowers and a journalist. The ‘Luxembourg Leaks’ scandal revealed how secrecy undermines corporate tax ...

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European Commission’s Tax Transparency Package keeps tax deals secret

Campaigners disappointed with unambitious package but European Commission has second chance to deliver in June Wednesday 18th March 2015 The European Commission’s new measures to combat secret tax deals made between multinational companies and governments cannot be called tax transparency, as they fail to give citizens access to any information. The Tax Transparency Package, published today in response to the Luxembourg Leaks scandal, makes some improvements to the information that tax administrations ...
+Plateforme Paradis Fiscaux et Judiciaires
This week, more than 30 organisations from the Tax Justice Europe network have written to members of the European Parliament strongly supporting a proposal from Green MEPs for a stand alone investigative committee in the wake of the 'Luxembourg Leaks' ...

press
Eurodad reaction to the Luxembourg Leaks investigation

Following the revelations surrounding tax avoidance schemes in Luxembourg, Tove Maria Ryding, Tax Justice coordinator at the European Network on Debt and Development, said: "This is deeply concerning and shows that international corporate taxation is in a state of crisis. At a point in time when there is a desperate need for public finance, this collapse in corporate taxation requires urgent action from governments to stem this financial hemorrhage. EU Finance Ministers are meeting tomorrow. We need ...

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Financing for whose development? DFIs and their support for companies that use tax havens

Mathieu Vervynckt

04 Nov 2014 11:58:53

This blog first appeared on From Poverty to Power. The Third UN Conference on Financing for Development (FfD), set to take place in Addis Ababa next year, will be a crucial opportunity to discuss two of the hottest topics in development finance today: the use of scarce public resources to leverage the private sector, and the fight against international tax avoidance and evasion. Both topics come together in Eurodad’s new report, Going Offshore, though probably not in the way you might expect.  Previous Eurodad research has shown that despite the lack of public information about how they work and their impact on development, Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) – government-controlled institutions that support private sector projects in developing countries – have come to ...