Private
finance
Debt
Tax
justice
Aid
Financial
architecture

Search by publisher


Display by category

Search results

As world leaders prepare for the G20 Summit in Germany later this week, plans for new financing initiatives for Africa have been put in doubt by a US$2 bn loan scandal in Mozambique. The German G20 Presidency intends to use the summit to promote the ...
+eurodad
Use our new interactive infographic to investigate what PDBs are, why their inconsistent performance is often due to the institutions themselves, and what a blueprint for a model PDB would look like.

blog
Blended finance and the new aid rules: a risky mix?

Maria Romero, Polly Meeks

01 Jun 2017 09:40:01

Last week’s UN Financing for Development Forum showed that blended finance – using aid money to mobilise finance from other sources, especially the private sector – continues to top the agenda for many of the big players in development finance.  In fact, upcoming decisions in Paris and Brussels are likely to confirm blending as a much bigger part of Official Development Assistance (ODA) than ever before.  In Paris, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development’s Development Assistance Committee (OECD DAC) will shortly decide on new aid rules that allow greater official support to the private sector, including blending, to be counted as ODA.  Meanwhile in Brussels, the European Commission is currently in the process of negotiating with the European Parliament ...

blog
Countdown to the 2017 UN Financing for Development Forum

Bodo Ellmers

04 May 2017 10:12:45

In less than three weeks, governments, CSOs and international organizations gather at the UN in New York for the Financing for Development Forum. The forum takes place in crucial times as the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals faces severe financial constraints. Governments’ self-inflicted inability to raise sufficient taxes paired with rich countries’ unwillingness to provide sufficient aid means that development is all too often financed by borrowed money, a dilemma that is aggravated by new donor initiatives that even turn the limited grants into new debt, through blending facilities. In the meantime, developing countries’ shouts for debt relief are getting ever louder. This Financing for Development Forum promises to be very interesting.   What’s at stake?  ...

blog
IMF and World Bank Spring Meetings: drifting off course as multilateralism faces headwinds.

Bodo Ellmers, Maria Romero

25 Apr 2017 09:05:58

The 2017 spring meetings of the IMF and World Bank, which also included the second edition of the Global Infrastructure Forum, took place against the uncertainty generated by geopolitical changes such as the election of President Trump in the US and the formalisation of the UK’s exit from the European Union. A draft budget proposal by President Trump, released in the run-up to the Spring Meetings, overshadowed last week's discussions as it suggests that instead of getting a capital increase, the World Bank will experience a substantial cut in its funding from its main shareholder. Meanwhile, civil society organisations (CSOs) voiced their concerns about how far the Bretton Woods Institutions are from serving development objectives. Systematic and concerned focus on private finance. ...

press
International conference on responsible taxation in development finance

Media Advisory: International conference on responsible taxation in development finance What: Pierre Moscovici, European Commissioner for Economic and Financial Affairs, Taxation and Customs, will kick off this conference on establishing responsible tax standards for Development Finance Institutions such as the European Investment Bank, the World Bank’s International Finance Corporation and national institutions. Speakers will include government officials from the Global South and North, UN ...

blog
Three principles for aid and the private sector

Jesse Griffiths

17 Oct 2016 16:32:59

Originally published by Public Finance International Using aid to mobilise trillions in private money is a hot and hugely controversial topic. Such aid is no different from any other kind: it can be well spent or badly spent and should meet basic effectiveness principles Donor governments are currently revising rules on Official Development Assistance (ODA or ‘aid’) so that the opportunities for using aid to leverage – or more accurately, subsidise – private companies and private investment could explode. This is, of course, hugely controversial, and Eurodad has warned that more care, thought and time should be devoted to such rule changes, involve recipients and stakeholders and be preceded by a firm commitment from donors not to tie aid to the use of their own firms. When we talk ...

blog
International public finance flows: 8 principles for transparent reporting

Jesse Griffiths

08 Sep 2016 14:19:02

How much public money does your country send to other countries, and for what purposes? The short answer is: we don’t know. The only reliable figures are those for the aid provided to help developing countries, collected by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and called official development assistance. Unfortunately, even these figures are confusing, as they include large amounts of money that never leave the donor country, such as administrative costs and and the costs of accommodating refugees. A better place to look than the headline-grabbing ODA figures is a less well-known measure, called country programmable aid which the OECD says is “a better estimate of the volume of [ODA] resources transferred to developing countries.” But what about other official flows ...