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Three changes the OECD needs to make to guard the poorest in new aid rules

Jeroen Kwakkenbos, Jesse Griffiths

20 Feb 2017 12:56:01

Originally published by Devex It has been a busy couple of years for the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee, the body in charge of determining what can and cannot be counted as “aid” to poor countries, or official development assistance. Major changes to aid have already been made during a year-long process of modernization of the ODA rules, but the biggest change in decades is yet to come. This March, the DAC will decide on how to include what are known as private sector instruments in aid. This could mean a dramatic increase in the use of aid to invest in or give loans to private companies, or to agree to bail out failed private sector projects through guarantees. Without strong safeguards and transparency standards there is a real risk that aid could be used as a backdoor subsidy ...

press
Mixed progress on improving aid quality, but half of aid contracts still go back to rich country firms

Friday November 4 2016 RICH countries need to come clean about how much aid money they plan to use to subsidise their own companies. A ‘Progress Report’ published last night (November 3) by the Global Partnership for Effective Development Co-operation (GPEDC) states that nearly half of the aid money used to procure goods and services still goes back to suppliers in their own country – a practice known as ‘tied aid’. The practice continues even though Global Partnership figures ...
On Monday 10 October, arguably the biggest change to Overseas Development Assistance (ODA or 'aid') for over 40 years will be agreed at a meeting of donors in Paris. The OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) will be asked to approve reforms ...

blog
Paddling against the tide: How the changes in the OECD’s definition of aid continue to undermine global efforts against poverty - a statement by African civil society

Eurodad

07 Mar 2016 12:39:20

This article was originally published on Oxfam International's website on 29 February 2016.  Not even half a year ago, world leaders adopted the Agenda 2030, the latest global agreement towards transforming our world for the betterment of all humankind. With its bold pledge to leave no one behind, and a new set of urgent goals and targets which came into effect at the beginning of 2016, the Agenda represents an ambitious and universal programme to bring the world together for the purpose of addressing pressing and enduring global social, economic and environmental challenges in an integrated way. Yet last week, the OECD’s Development Assistance Committee (DAC) – the body which oversees the OECD’s aid policy and spending – met in Paris to review progress in its “ODA modernization ...

blog
Commitments of the past, present and future.

Jeroen Kwakkenbos

16 Apr 2015 17:23:20

Commitments of the past, present and future. For the international development community, 2015 is the year that will make the future, with several major events determining what should be achieved, how it should be achieved and how it will be financed. New goals and commitments are in the works and a wild assortment of ideas are on the table, but it is important to learn from the successes and failures of commitments made in the past. Past Speaking of past commitments, 2015 is also a big year for the EU and its member states. In 1970 the United Nations General Assembly adopted a resolution which stated “Each economically advanced country will progressively increase its official development assistance (ODA) to the developing countries and will exert its best efforts to reach ...
Eurodad recently made a submission to a discussion hosted by the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation (GPEDC) on "Leveraging Effective Development Cooperation (EDC) to mobilize existing resources for development and enhance private ...