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Countdown to the 2017 UN Financing for Development Forum 

In less than three weeks, governments, CSOs and international organizations gather at the UN in New York for the Financing for Development Forum. The forum takes place in crucial times as the implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals faces severe financial constraints. Governments’ self-inflicted inability to raise sufficient taxes, paired with rich countries’ unwillingness to provide sufficient aid, means that development is all too often financed by borrowed money. In the meantime, developing countries’ shouts for debt relief are getting ever louder.
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Why a free press is vital for exposing financial injustice
In recognition of World Press Freedom Day, we remember that it was only through journalists' dogged pursuit of the truth - with the help of courageous whistleblowers - that we are able to read about two of the biggest financial scandals of recent times - Luxleaks and the Panama Papers...

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Crunch time for the OECD’s new aid rules?
In this blog, our policy officer on aid effectiveness Polly Meeks analyses the OECD’s recent discussions on channelling more aid to the private sector. She warns that while the discussions might easily go unnoticed –their impact on the lives of people in the global south could be far-reaching.
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IMF and World Bank Spring Meetings: drifting off course as multilateralism faces headwinds 
We assess the 2017 Spring Meetings and find a systematic and concerned focus on private finance, public development banks that are far from delivering inclusive, sustainable infrastructure, limited appetite to act on new debt crises, and possibly some hope for the International Finance Corporation's investments in financial intermediaries.
Member Report
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Unjust Enrichment: How the IFC Profits from Land Grabbing in Africa
The World Bank Group has indirectly financed some of Africa’s most notorious land grabs, according to a new report by Inclusive Development International and other watchdogs, including Eurodad member Bank Information Center. The WBG’s private-sector arm is enabling and profiting from these projects by outsourcing its development funds to the financial sector.
 
 
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What’s New

USEFUL RESOURCES
This new report from Transparency International EU exposes major flaws in European anti-money laundering regimes.  

Civil society groups, including Eurodad, submitted comments on the IATF draft report: Financing for Development. Progress and prospects.
 
IN ACTION
At the Spring Meetings of the IMF and World Bank, María José Romero spoke at a partners’ side event, “Legal framework of PPPs and infrastructure projects in Latin America”. Bodo Ellmers spoke at Reality of Aid's side-event "Assessing IMF-WB's Technical Cooperation for Achieving the 2030 Agenda".
 
EVENTS
The Eurodad International Conference 2017 will take place this June 20-22 in The Hague, The Netherlands. The event will be live-streamed via the Eurodad Facebook page, and viewers will be able to participate and ask questions. 
 
FACTS & FIGURES 
A yearlong investigation uncovered 134 harmful or risky projects financed by 29 IFC financial-sector clients. A database of the findings can be found here.
 
VACANCY
Eurodad is looking for a Communications Associate to join our team. Deadline 13 May. 2017. 
Copyright © 2017 Eurodad, All rights reserved.




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